Friday, Nov. 17, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 18, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

This conference, jointly presented by The Huntington and Carnegie Observatories, marks the centennial of the completion of the 100-inch Hooker telescope on Mount Wilson, which saw first light in November 1917. The world's largest telescope of the era, the 100-inch heralded the dawn of modern astronomy. Historians, scientists, curators of science collections, and others will explore the influence of big telescopes, the significance of discoveries at Mount Wilson, the gendered nature of astronomy, and other related issues in the history of Southern California as an arena for the exploration of space.  

ImagePasadena, CA— The next generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-V), directed by Carnegie’s Juna Kollmeier, will move forward with mapping the entire sky following a $16 million grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The grant will kickstart a groundbreaking all-sky spectroscopic survey for a next wave of discovery, anticipated to start in 2020.

ImagePasadena, CA— It’s the celestial equivalent of a horror movie villain—a star that wouldn’t stay dead.

An international team of astronomers including Carnegie’s Nick Konidaris and Benjamin Shappee discovered a star that exploded multiple times over a period of 50 years. The finding, published by Nature, completely confounds existing knowledge of a star’s end of life, and Konidaris’ instrument-construction played a crucial role in analyzing the phenomenon.