G. Rudie
Y. Beletsky
C. L. Hunt
M. Campo
FourStar collaboration

We explore & discover

The history of 20th century astronomy is inextricably linked to the Carnegie Observatories. From the revelation of the universe’s expansion to the discovery of dark energy, Carnegie Observatories scientists have transformed humankind’s understanding of the cosmos. The groundbreaking work continues today at our world-famous Las Campanas Observatory in Chile, home to the twin Magellan telescopes, and site of the future Giant Magellan Telescope. Carnegie scientists are still at the vanguard of research on galaxy formation and evolution, the chemical evolution of stars and planets, stellar variability, supernovae, and more.

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Friday, April 26, 2019 - 2:15pm to 3:00pm
Nicholas Martis (Tufts)
Monday, April 29, 2019 - 6:45pm
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Latest articles and news

TESS finds its first Earth-sized planet

Pasadena, CA—A nearby system hosts the first Earth-sized planet discovered by NASA’s Transiting Exoplanets Survey Satellite, as well as a warm sub-Neptune-sized world, according to a new paper from a team of astronomers that includes Carnegie’s Johanna Teske, Paul Butler, Steve Shectman, Jeff Crane, and Sharon Wang.

Their work is published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters.

Where is Earth’s submoon?

Pasadena, CA— “Can moons have moons?”

This simple question—asked by the four-year old son of Carnegie’s Juna Kollmeier—started it all.  Not long after this initial bedtime query,  Kollmeier was coordinating a program at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics (KITP)  on the Milky Way while her one-time college classmate Sean Raymond of Université de Bordeaux was attending a parallel KITP program on the dynamics of Earth-like planets.   After discussing this very simple question at a seminar, the two joined forces to solve it.  Their findings are the basis of a paper published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

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